RISING WATER ANGLERS – Spey Fishing Coastal Northern California Steelhead

RISING WATER ANGLERS - Spey Fishing Coastal Northern California Steelhead

RISING WATER ANGLERS – Spey Fishing Coastal Northern California Steelhead

Nov thru March.
Please check with me for available dates.
Half day walk and wade trips $300
Full day walk and wade trips $450
Full day float trips $500
Full days will consist of 8-10 hours of fishing.
Rivers we may fish depending on the current runs and conditions: Smith, Klamath, Mad, Van Dusen, Eel, Matole.
Contact info:
Mike Ball
Mikeb904@gmail.com or on Facebook at RISING WATER ANGLERS

TLTFF Beaver Island ’14 – Day 5 – Guest Post

This Beautiful Carp Was Caught By Austin Green On A 3-TAND T-90

This Beautiful Carp Was Caught By Austin Green On A 3-TAND T-90

Possibly one of the most photographed days, one that none of us will ever forget not only from the insanely amazing fishing, but by the way it was documented.

Captain Kevin Morlock With A Beaver Island Carp

Captain Kevin Morlock With A Beaver Island Carp

Day 5 – June 23rd
 
Our alarms were set for about 7:30am so we could be up and ready for an 8am breakfast at the deli…but I don’t think a single one of those alarms went off. Most of us were up around 7am as we all knew from checking out weather reports the previous night, it was bound to be a great day. The winds were due to stay down to almost nothing all day and the clouds were going to burn off early giving us open sun for almost the entire day. This not only meant that conditions would be ideal for fishing, but the water would be warming up, bringing the carp in skinnier for a meal.
As we made our way down towards McDonough’s Deli, everyone had a good pep in their step courtesy of a 1knot steady wind, 65 F air temp, and picturesque morning. We met up with Kevin, Steve, and Austin at the deli and had yet another amazing breakfast. We paired up and setup fishing partners for the day…Luis and Mario, Joel and Cheryl, and Austin and I. Luis and Mario would be fishing with Steve, Joel and Cheryl would be fishing with Austin, and Austin and I would be fishing with Kevin.

After finishing up breakfast, we picked out lunch and tossed it into our guides coolers before heading back to the house and gearing up. Getting prepped for the day took slightly longer as putting on sunscreen was paramount due to the days forecast. Anglers are becoming more and more conscious of the importance of sun protection from the level of sunscreen application to clothing selection. I love my 12wt WORKwt gloves, they give great protection not only from the sun but the thousands of strips I make a day while on the water. Every day of the trip I wore long sleeve 45+ SPF shirts and a Buff and hat. Since waders always covered our lower halves, everyone was protected there.

I was equipped with my 8wt Redington Vapen Red and Allen Fly Fishing Kraken in size 4. Austin geared up with Austin Adduci’s 9wt TFO Axiom and the 3-TAND T-90 reel. Kevin pulled up to the house and we loaded up the boat before heading down the street to drop the boat in at the local ramp. For once, the weather man was right, it was a bluebird day with zero wind…the Lake was glassy and the water was crystal clear (partially thanks to the invasive zebra mussels that constantly filter it). As we began to motor out, it was a little cooler (as was typical for the mornings throughout the trip) and called for wading jackets. We were about 100yds from the ramp and Kevin realized he had forgotten his jacket in the truck so we turned around to grab it giving us the perfect opportunity to ride out with Steve, Luis, and Kevin on our port side and an awesome photo op…

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After shooting some photo and video, we went our separate ways…Steve, Luis, and Mario off to fish some of the bays North of the island while we took the short shot East towards the Three Bird Islands. A little about the bed islands…a lot of birds chill there and therefore they are loud and smell terrible. As Kevin put it, “stepping foot on that island would be absolute hell.” Austin and I agreed…at points it was hard to hear the other people talk as we got closer. The flats surrounding bird island can only be described as something you would see in the keys. They were a bit deeper and had rocky bottoms but they surrounded the entire island giving us the opportunity to pole 360 degrees around for a few laps.

Morgan Kupfer And Captain Kevin Morlock On Their  Way  To The FIrst Fishing Spot Of The Morning

Morgan Kupfer And Captain Kevin Morlock Motoring To Bird Island

We powered down and Kevin hopped up on the platform. Austin was up on the bow first. Within 10 minutes we started to see carp, and not just any carp, mudding carp. We didn’t have to opportunity to see mudding carp with Steve, especially not this close. The depth of the water ranged from 3-10′ with a majority of the fish feeding around 6-8′. Knowing sink rates of flies was paramount and heavier flies were tied on. Kevin tied on some phenomenal ties that I can only describe as large damsel nymphs. We first tried an olive and yellow pattern that would prove to be extremely productive. The large dumbbell eyes of the tie helped get the fly down along with the longer leaders Kevin tied on.

Kevin Morlock Rowing Along The Island

Kevin Morlock Rowing Along The Island

As we poled up on the first round of carp, Austin stripped out some line. With a mudding carp in the cross-hairs, he began to fire off a cast and let his fly drop with precision right in front of and ahead of the carp. Kevin’s instructions were exact, I think all of us would agree that if you were blindfolded on his bow, he could paint a picture for you good enough to get you hooked up. He is constantly talking to you and isn’t afraid to be honest, especially when you botch a cast. With Austin in front of me, the carp off to our left, and Kevin behind me giving instructions, I had a front row seat. “Great cast, now let it sink, now strip strip strip strip stop. He sees it….(long pause)…strip…he’s got it.” I look away from the fish as my view wasn’t as good and I didn’t see the eat…boom, Austin strips and lifts his stick…FISH ON!

Austin Green Fighting His First Beaver Island Carp

Austin Green Fighting His First Beaver Island Carp

Austin Green With His FIrst Beaver Island Carp

Austin Green With His FIrst Beaver Island Carp

We had been powered down and poling for about 15 minutes and with Austin’s first set of casts, he was hooked up. It was amazing, it set the tempo for the rest of the day. As Austin lifted his stick, the carp didn’t hesitate making a solid run straight off the bow. I snagged Austin’s camera at some pint during the fight to take some video and photos. The carp was a heavy fighter and Austin couldn’t believe the power behind the fish. My heart was racing as fast as his as I watched knowing I was up next, and there were carp all around us, all over the flat. After a 10 minute fight, Austin “gulped” the fish and it was in the boat. Photos were taken, fish was released healthy, and high-fives were had…and it was my turn to take the bow.

Austin Green With His Second Beaver Island Carp

Austin Green With His Second Beaver Island Carp

Morgan Kupfer On Captain Kevin Morlock's Boat

Morgan Kupfer On Captain Kevin Morlock’s Boat

 

Kevin continued to pole us along the flat, around the island and within 5 minutes, I had two mudding carp at my 1 o’clock. Kevin picked them out and instructed me perfectly onto the fish. My first cast was completely behind them, my second way in front of them. During the first day, with Steve, my casting was flawless and that was with some wind…these last two casts got in my head. My third cast spooked the fish, time to find more. A few minutes later we found a few more mudding fish, bypassing constant waves of cruisers. With my last blow shot fresh in my head, I threw a cast, not bad but definitely not good. I let my fly sink and watched one of the mudders turn its head and start to chase my fly. From my great perspective on the bow, I watched the carp chase the fly a solid 5-8′ until the fly was sucked in, I immediately set the hook (yes I trout set) and saw my fly again. I had pulled the fly out of the fishes mouth before it was able to close its mouth…I completely jumped the gun. Everyone on the boat deflated as we all saw what had happened.
Kevin immediately let me know what I had done wrong and then said, “lets find another fish.” My mind was everywhere, I had blown my first and second shots at fish, two hungry fish and I blew it. Damn it. We made a lap around bird island and didn’t see any fish for the whole north, rockier side of the island. We got around the point of the island and found a cruiser coming across the boulder laden flat  threw a cast. The carp followed, third time is the charm right? No, as if the fish had been talking, I pulled the fly out of its mouth again. I was pissed.
I took a moment, thought about giving up the bow and decided to give these fish one more shot. We poled around the southern part of bird island again and after we passed over a small reef to get back onto the flats, we found more mudders. I had about 5 fish around me, from 9 to 3 o’clock. Confused as to which fish to go for, Kevin did the leg work for me and targeted a fish. With two false casts, I let one rip and it was perfect. I had slightly overshot the fish on purpose and began to strip back. I pulled the fly right under the feeding carps nose and he began to follow. In a perfectly cinematic fashion, the boat got entirely quiet and I watched the fish eat. I waited a second and watched the mouth close this time, I had learned my lesson (twice). I strip set and boom, FISH ON! A huge weight came off my shoulders and Kevin started to laugh, I think saying something along the lines of “finally”.

Morgan Kupfer And His First Beaver Island Carp Of The Day

Morgan Kupfer And His First Beaver Island Carp Of The Day

 

After an awesome run I noticed the line slowed down and then stopped coming off the reel. I began to reel in my backing and noticed there wasn’t much resistance. All I cold think was that the fish had come unbuttoned…nope, it was making a run back at the boat. I found later in the day this was a common occurrence, Kevin basically said “the fish run away, realize that doesn’t get the pain out of their lip, so they try something different and make a run back to the source.” Made perfect sense as the fish came to the boat, did a fly by, and began to run off the stern. So Kevin turned the boat and I fought the fish in. We “gulped” it and repeated the motions we had gone through with Austin’s fish. I was stoked, the monkey was off both of our backs and we were only about an hour into the day.
Over the course of the next two hours, we continued to fish the bird island flats and Austin and I each put another fish into the boat. As the bite on that flat slowed down and we saw less and less mudders, Kevin asked us “do you guys want to keep finding fish or go cow hunting?” Austin and I were content with either and said we were done for whatever, essentially leaving the decision up to Kevin…so cow hunting it was.

Kevin Morlock Searching For Big Carp

Kevin Morlock Searching For Big Carp

 

We powered up and headed over to Hog Island. We started at the end of “The Pigtail” and anchored up for lunch. After reminiscing about the multiple fish we had already put in the boat and taking a look at some of the shots Austin had taken we began chowing down on some amazing McDonough’s Deli sandwiches. Kevin had the weather radio on during lunch, waiting for the central lake forecast. This was a common thing for the guides to do during lunch as having the radios on while fishing typically spooks out fish. Lunch was finished almost as quickly as it had started and Kevin hopped back up on the platform. We poled our way down the bank, about 20yds off the island and in 4-6′ of water (some drop-offs went down to 10′ but we didn’t see mudders in that water, just cruisers).
We immediately started to see fish cruising parallel to the shore. Some were skinnier, others right in line with the boat. As fish came down to us, we fired off shot after shot, generally with fish paying no attention to us. I was on the bow and we were coming up on a large boulder that had a dark figure behind it cruising to us fast. Kevin said, “Morgan, carp at 11 o’clock coming in fast.” and I immediately spotted it. My first cast landed a few feet in front of it and the fish kicked its fin towards the fly hard. It wasn’t until I had set the hook that we all realized it was a smallmouth, a big smallmouth. I fought the fish in quick as we had more carp approaching off the bow and we snapped a few photos before releasing it. The smallie was the biggest I had ever caught, weighing in at a guestimate of about 5.5lbs and it had a pretty awesome tag on its lip. Kevin told us that the smallmouth in the great lakes are among the most studied in the world and the tagging programs are amazing.

A Beautiful Beaver Island Smallmouth

A Beautiful Beaver Island Smallmouth

This Smallmouth Is Tagged

This Smallmouth Is Tagged

Now that's A Carp!

Now that’s A Carp!

Morgan Kupfer With A Beautiful Carp

Morgan Kupfer With A Beautiful Carp

She Had A Beautiful Face

She Had A Beautiful Face

A Huge Carp Tail!

A Huge Carp Tail!

With more carp ahead, I threw another cast at a cruising fish and began to strip. The fly wasn’t anywhere near the 6′ bottom but that was because the carp was cursing at about 3′ under the surface. I continued to strip per Kevin’s instructions and the fish kicked its tail just like the smallie. It came at my fly double time and aggressive. The eat was amazing, almost right on the surface and it inhaled my fly. I set the hook and had yet another amazing fight full of backing and great runs. The fish was in and released completely healthy. Austin was up, he picked up the rod and I picked up the camera, we switched roles perfectly. One thing we noticed about the carp cursing at us was they were getting bigger and bigger. My fish was massive, my biggest of the trip to that point and Austin would go on to get his as well, literally in his first cast at his first fish after taking the bow. With another solid fight, just as amazing as the previous ones, we knew we had gotten into the big fish.

Austin Green Spots A Happy Fish

Austin Green Spots A Happy Fish

Austin Green Has An Epic Fight On His Hands

Austin Green Has An Epic Fight On His Hands

The 3-TAND T-90 Performs Beautifully Against Big Carp

The 3-TAND T-90 Performs Beautifully Against Big Carp

Captain Kevin Morlock SHowing Off His Client's Catch

Captain Kevin Morlock Showing Off His Client’s Catch

An Interesting Perspective!

An Interesting Perspective!

Austin Green And A Beautiful Carp

Austin Green And A Beautiful Carp

 

I stepped up on the bow just as we began to pole past a flooded out reed area on the island. Austin and I had heard a splash up near the reeds and we all assumed it was on the other side of the small strip of land (The Pigtail). We had seen carp breeching all around us all day so we thought it was safe to assume that fish were doing the same all around the island. As I took a closer look at the reeds, Austin and I noticed some of them were moving in different directions than the small little spits of breeze were pushing the others. We convinced Kevin to pole in close for a better look and as we crept in, sure enough, a nice 20lber came cursing out of the reeds. With a few shots fired at it, the fish spooked but we were all left baffled as Kevin said he hadn’t seen that behavior. It was neat for all of us to see and I explained to Kevin how redfish are known to do the same during flood tides to find food.
After poling back out away from the island a bit, I had taken the bow again. I was continuing to watch the water for my next shot when Kevin said, “Morgan, there’s your third species.” It took me a minute to figure out what he had meant. I looked down off my right side and there sat a massive Sheepshead, a freshwater drum. I had the chance to hook and land a fish that would give me a “slam”. It was feeding around a boulder in about 10′ of water. I cast and let my fly sink right off the right side of the fish. It turned and examined the fly for a few seconds before slowly swimming off into deeper water. Although getting a slam would have been a cool feather to pop into my hat, it didn’t happen. But what an experience to see another species.

Morgan Kupfer Kupfer Wearing The Dizm Dempsey Sport Glasses And The Nature Boy Designs Hatch Patch

Morgan Kupfer Kupfer Wearing The Dizm Dempsey Sport Glasses And The Nature Boy Designs Hatch Patch

Austin Green Wearing A Great Feathers Simm's Camo Hat With The Nature Boy Designs Hatch Patch

Austin Green Wearing A Great Feathers Simms Camo Hat With The Nature Boy Designs Hatch Patch

As the bite slowed down again, Kevin decided to make the 30-45 minute run out to two islands he hadn’t fished yet this year. The islands literally looked like something you would see in a Caribbean traveler magazine (minus the bugs). They were white sand covered, surrounded by turquoise waters and amazing flats. The bugs around the islands were by-far the worst but we would soon find out, those didn’t matter. With glassy water making the run possible, we powered down and began to work the flat. Throughout the day we had changed flies a few times but they were the same pattern and size with the only variation being color.

A Beautiful Beaver Island Carp Flat

A Beautiful Beaver Island Carp Flat

The 3-TAND T-90

The 3-TAND T-90

The Feather-Craft Meat Locker

The Feather-Craft Meat Locker

We had hooked up on black/white, olive/yellow, and olive/pink.. Austin took the bow first and after a solid 20 minutes, we were onto feeding fish. Austin fired off a cast and was hooked up, a common theme of the day. After a few minutes of fighting, the fish came off. We checked the hook and line and all looked well. Austin had numerous mudding fish around him and yet again, per Kevin’s on-point instructions, was on. This fish fought much longer…but unbuttoned again.

Ar! Captain Morgan!

Ar! Captain Morgan!

Ar! Captain Morgan!

Ar! Captain Morgan!

After a fly change for Austin, it was my turn to take the bow again. With a few big refusals and denials of fish pursuing and peeling off before the bite, I started to watch the clock knowing the day was coming to an end. Kevin spotted a massive fish that I was able to get to feed and within seconds it came off. This time it was not a mystery as to why it had happened, I was broken off. With a new leader and fly tied on, this time the same pattern as all of our previous fish but in a Halloween color combo of black/orange, I began to fire off casts. After multiple denials in a row, Kevin told me to cut off 50% of the tail of the fly. While snipping the tail, Kevin said, “Morgan, get ready.” I looked up and dropped my fly in the water.

Captain Kevin Morgan

Captain Kevin Morgan

What I looked up to see was a fish with shoulders on it that I had never seen before, absolutely massive. My first thought was, “holy smokes…I only have on 10lb tippet.” My second thought was interrupted by Kevin saying, “Thats a really big fish…Morgan, don’t F*** this up.” Real confidence booster huh? I fired off a cast, way behind the fish as it was cruising from 11 o’clock to 10. I let out another cast and this time it was on point as the fish followed it down during the sink. I could feel the adrenaline kick in like an Epinephrine shot to the heart and as everyone on the boat gasped, the fish ate. I set the hook and before I could blink, all I could hear was my backing knot zinging through my guides. I looked down to turn on my chest-mounted GoPro and realized it was already on. Yes. This fish fought like no other, and multiple times it made me think, “my rods definitely going to snap.” With 4 heavy heavy runs, I finally was able to put the wood to this fish and get it to gulp next to the boat. With every run, I had gone deeper into my backing and a solid 12 minute fight was over. Kevin netted the fish and simply said, “wow.” I looked over, with shaking legs, and my jaw hit the ground. Austin nearly dropped his camera as we all sat in awe of the fish my 8wt with 10lb tippet had just landed. I had tied my tippet onto my newCutthroat “Carp” Furled Leader that we had been given for the trip, it had performed flawlessly. I imagine the reason I did land that fish was because of the give that leader had…I was impressed.

Morgan Kupfer Battling A Huge Carp

Morgan Kupfer Battling A Huge Carp

Morgan Kupfer Battling A Huge Carp

Morgan Kupfer Battling A Huge Carp

Morgan Kupfer Battling A Huge Carp

Morgan Kupfer Battling A Huge Carp

Morgan Kupfer Battling A Huge Carp

Morgan Kupfer Battling A Huge Carp

Kevin let me sit down after acting like a child and giving out at least half a dozen high-fives and fist bumps and he asked, “are you ready?” I replied with a huge “YES” and he pulled the fish onto the boat. We again yelled and high-fived before I picked up the fish and put it in my lap. I looked at Kevin and said, “this fish weighs more than my daughter.” For those of you who don’t know, my daughter Lilly is 2…she weighs about 32lbs. After snapping an unbelievable amount of photos and grabbing some video, it was time to put my girl back in the net to weigh with Kevin’s calibrated scale. I was right, 34lbs, she did weigh more than Lilly. But here’s where the amazing part comes in. Kevin took a good look at the fish and informed us that she was a spent female, meaning she had already released all of her eggs and that a few weeks prior, she could have been 10-15lbs heavier while carrying that cargo…wow. After a more-than-healthy release, I had to sit back down. I was shaking like I had seen a ghost. That fish was by-far the largest freshwater fish I had caught and easily the largest fish I have ever caught on the fly.

Carp Netted!

Carp Netted!

Feels SO Good

Feels SO Good

Look At That Monster!

Look At That Monster!

My Favorite Photo Of The Trip: Morgan And Kevin With The Brute

My Favorite Photo Of The Trip: Morgan And Kevin With The Brute

The Release!

The Release!

 

We all sat back with smiles as big as our faces. The bell had rung and that fish had come just in time before we had to make the long run back in. The water was glassy as we ran back over deep holes and shallow flats, spooking all types of species and all I could think about was what had just happened. I looked at Austin and we both gave each other a pat on the back knowing we had both just had the best fishing day of our lives. I reached down, reminiscing about that last fish and had to pinch myself…it was real.
We got back in to the ramp right after Austin and trailered his boat. Joel and Cheryl had another great day, landing multiple smallmouth and having some great carp follows (unfortunately no eats). after getting back to the house, Austin and I still had the bug and decided to walk down to the harbor flat for a few casts as we waited for Steve, Luis, and Mario to come in. As we got into the water we spooked about a dozen 20lbers out of the flooded grasses. As we walked down and rounded the point into Gulls Harbor Austin decided to head back and shower and I decided to trek the shoreline alone back towards the rocks we had fished the first day on the island when we waded. As I crept down the shoreline, I spotted somewhere around a hundred fish laid up in the grasses and skinny water as shallow as 1′. I took shots at almost every one I saw without a single fish showing interest. Later I found out from the guides they were taking advantage of the weather and temps and sunbathing. I got down to the rocks and had pod after pod of fish come in without interest until a pair cruised in closer than the others and stopped to eat.
I threw one cast to the front fish and he saw right over it. The trailing fish turned and ate with full aggression. Just when I thought the day couldn’t get any better, I was hooked up again. I landed the fish, a nice 12-15lber and released it on the flat. As I watched it swim off, I noticed another pair coming in from the opposite direction. I popped back up on the rock and threw out another cast. This one I believe false-hooked the fish so I popped it off quickly so I wouldn’t risk injuring the fish. That was enough for me…6 fish total, way more than I imagined I would have landed in one day based off of stories others had told from weeks and years past.


As I trekked through the clouds of midges and took in the beauty of the island all by myself, I felt my phone go off. I had missed Steve’s boat coming in and everyone was back at the house. I hurried back just in time to shower before dinner. I came out as the guides pulled up to a brew from Mario and Luis and a whole lot of stoke. Mario and Luis had also had a banner day full of pike, smallmouth, carp and an amazing double up where both put 20lb fish in the boat at the same time.








Mario and Luis had put multiple pike in the boat, including this massive fish by Mario, his largest to date.


We headed off to yet another amazing dinner at Stoney Acre Grill & Pub on the other side of the island. Figuring out what to order was one of the toughest things as everything on the menu sounded like a home run. I ended up ordering what almost everyone else did, the Wet Burrito. That name will forever be remembered by us all as we figured out where the “Wet” part of the name came from the next day…it was totally worth it, I’d do it again.

As we headed back to the house, we all felt better and better about what the day had in store as every story made us laugh and smile. We truly were on vacation, relaxed as we should have been and teeming with excitement knowing the trip wasn’t over yet. We still had one more half day of fishing ahead of us and it was shaping up to finish off the trip with some final memories to reminisce about during the 14 hour drive back home we had in store after our last day of fishing.
Photo credit goes to Luis and Mario for the photos above that are posted right after their paragraph, awesome shots!

By Morgan Kupfer – Originally Posted On His Blog TLTFF

TLTFF Beaver Island ’14 – Day 4

Austin Adduci, His Truck And His Boat - Fly Fishing With Indigo Guide Service On Beaver Island

Austin Adduci, His Truck And His Boat – Fly Fishing With Indigo Guide Service On Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

I tucked myself into my wading jacket as we made our way towards the first fishing spot of the morning. Cloudy skies dominated the horizon and a choppy wind swell threw around Captain Austin Adduci’s boat as we motored away from shore. “Can that thing get wet?” Captain Adduci asked, referring to my camera. “Nope” I responded, “but the bag is water tight.” “This boat is definitely the most comfortable boat between the guides, but It will also get you the most wet,” Captain Adduci warned me. Mario rode beside me as we made our way towards Fisherman’s Point to take our first shots at Beaver Island carp—sunny skies finally appearing in the distance as wear neared our destination.

Austin Adduci's Boat and Yeti - Fly Fishing With Indigo Guide Service On Beaver Island

Austin Adduci’s Boat and Yeti – Fly Fishing With Indigo Guide Service On Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Outboard Motor And Poling Platform On Austin Adduci's Boat - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Outboard Motor And Poling Platform On Austin Adduci’s Boat – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

I was up first; wielding a TFO Axiom 10wt, 3-TAND’s T-90 fly reel and a 10wt Rio Outbound fly line. Although the water was slightly nervous, one could still see straight to the bottom of the Beaver Island’s freshwater flats. The bright sunlight fell across the islands, flats and reefs, illuminating shades of aqua and blue—you could practically navigate exclusively by color. And navigation was of the highest necessity! The flats and reefs were littered with massive boulders, carried around by the winter’s ice. The most impressive boulder was one that appeared to weigh at least a few tons. A trench marked its miraculous journey for hundreds upon hundreds of yards. The thousands of shadowy rocks, densely spread across these flats, nearly resembled a graveyard—headstones marking the turning over of the lake, the birth, death and rebirth of the ecosystem throughout the seasons. As we rounded the point, the shadowy rocks began to move. This was not an illusion. This was carp! “Well I’ve done my job,” Captain Adduci noted, “now it’s all up to you!”

Austin Adduci Rowing Across The Flats  - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Austin Adduci Rowing Across The Flats – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Austin Adduci's Hands And Ink  - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Austin Adduci’s Hands And Ink – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

“Am I leading them correctly? Is there something wrong with my presentation? What’s going on?” I don’t know why it was so hard for me to understand that fish occasionally are just not hungry—after all, I never turn down a meal. After some persistent, hard fishing I finally managed to get a follow. It was a hard look, my presentation had sparked some attention. The carp followed my fly for five or ten yards and then… a flicker of orange lips. Hook set… shit! I felt the fly momentarily set into flesh and then pull out of the carp’s mouth. I was heartbroken.

Mario Garza Casting To A Big Carp - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Mario Garza Casting To A Big Carp – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Mario Garza Testing Out The 3-TAND T-90 - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Mario Garza Testing Out The 3-TAND T-90 – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

I turned over the fly rod to Mario, hoping he would do better and get a fish into the boat. I was confident he would succeed; the guy just looks fishy. We were testing 3-TAND’s T-90 reel and I was anxious to see how the reel would hold up against these carp. Mario began working some cruising fish, making a few casts at some happy lookers. Finally, Captain Adduci and Mario spotted the fish we had been looking for and Mario made the cast. Suddenly, the wind picked up in a surge and sent the fly line straight at the boat—Mario had just hooked himself in the head. It went straight through his hat, and after a moment of clarification, we knew that the hook was barbed and very stuck in his scalp. Captain Adduci didn’t seem too keen on removing hooks from scalps, so I offered to do the job.

Mario Garza With A Hook His Head - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Mario Garza With A Hook His Head – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

“Ill take it out Mario, but it’s going to hurt and you have to promise not to hit me,” I said jokingly. “I’m going to faint,” he replied as his body went limp, Captain Adduci and I guiding him into a seat. Unresponsive, with eyes rolling into his forehead, Mario had experienced an adrenalin response to the hook touching a nerve. We had no choice but to call for help and run him inshore. Mario came to shortly after Captain Adduci started the engine, and I held his jacket as the motor revved to nearly full throttle. Full plane across an area that was born to eat boat props, Austin said, “I’m going for it.” It was pretty badass.

After a short visit to the Emergency room, we decided to go back out and continue fishing. The island’s medical staff certainly made the most of their only patient of that week, and we soon learned that our adventure would be the talk of the island within the hour. This scary situation turned out to be quite funny. And although we didn’t land any carp that afternoon, Mario earned himself one freakishly large smallmouth and a bald spot above his left ear!

Mario Garza With A Huge Beaver Island Smallmouth - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Mario Garza With A Huge Beaver Island Smallmouth – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Mario Garza With A Huge Beaver Island Smallmouth - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Mario Garza With A Huge Beaver Island Smallmouth – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

By Austin Green 

Be sure to check out Morgan Kupfer’s perspective of day 4 on his blog, TLTFF!

 

TLTFF Beaver Island ’14 – Day 3 – Guest Post

Our Tent! - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Our Tent! – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Day 3 – June 21st

As with any fishing trip or vacation, sleeping in is a pretty tough task to accomplish. We all woke up right around 7:30am to a cool, sunny morning on the lawn of The Fisherman’s House. Four bodies in an 8-person tent was perfect, it kept the tent warm while also giving everyone enough space for the night. The air was crisp and the day had already started to shape up to be perfect. We all changed and threw on some warmer clothes before walking down the street to the deli for breakfast. We soon found out we were in for a treat from that point on when it came to eating food at or from the deli. A cup of coffee and a breakfast fit for a king was all it took for us to get ready for a day of fishing and exploration on foot around the island.

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

When we got back to the house, the outgoing anglers we just finishing packing up and loading up the trucks to head to the airport. One angler, Tom, stayed for the final half day of the guided trip and I believe the others left due to work obligations. Tom was from Colorado and had some great stories to tell of his experiences in Tenkara and fly fishing his way around the “Centennial State”. He was relatively new to the sport and fell in love pretty quickly. It was great hearing how fishing Beaver Island gave him even more of a drive to go out and fish abroad more, including a plan to fish some salt later this year down south.

Tom loaded up to head out for his final half day and we decided to throw together our gear and walk down the street to the opening of the harbor known as Gulls Point or Gulls Harbor. Kevin and Evan had given us some advice for fishing the flats by foot and pointed us in the right direction. We checked gear and doubled checked equipment before making the 1/4 mile walk down the street. Along the way we couldn’t help but stop and snap a few photos of the amazing offerings of Beaver Island.

Captain Steve Martinez's Ford Expedition And Guide Boat, Carp Diem - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Captain Steve Martinez’s Ford Expedition And Guide Boat, Carp Diem – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

The Coolest Ride On The Island, An Old Jeep - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

The Coolest Ride On The Island, An Old Jeep – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Good Morning Beaver Island! - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Good Morning Beaver Island! – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

A few of us were stopped by locals who were super stoked to see fisherman on the island and especially fly anglers. Everyone on Beaver knows the Indigo guides and what they do. Carp are no strangers to the locals as they see them cruise the flats and work the grasses right behind their houses often. The Indigo guides have been guiding Beaver for over a decade now. Kevin was the first shortly followed by Steve. Austin signed on about three years ago and was able to learn the ropes pretty quickly having already been a seasoned guide down in Chicago, IL for smallmouth, carp, pike and other great lake species. During a conversation later in the week with Kevin, he had brought up an amazing statistic he had been told by someone from the Chamber of Commerce on Beaver…that Indigo’s operation was responsible for bringing almost $200,000 in revenue to the island. That right there was amazing. Not only the large amount of money, but that a few guys, doing something they love, can help a place they love thrive. It was an awesome circle that made Beaver Island all that much more special knowing we could give back thanks to what the great guys at Indigo were doing.

Antique Boat Parts And Barge - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Antique Boat Parts And Barge – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

"Fishing Village" - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

“Fishing Village” – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

After having a few photos snapped by locals on both cell phones and snap and shoots for the local paper…we headed down into the water. The sights of Beaver Island consume you, from its natural beauty to the overall culture of the island. Beaver Island Head Light stands at the end of the road, right at the opening to the harbor as a beacon for ships coming into one of the deepest harbors an island on Lake MI has to offer. Standing in its shadow, overlooking the flats of Gulls Point was one of my most memorable moments of the trip for me.

Lighthouse, c.1870 - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Lighthouse, c.1870 – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Flooded Grasses, Beaver Island, MI - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Flooded Grasses, Beaver Island, MI – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

 

As we headed into Lake Michigan’s waters for the first time of the trip, we decided to stay in pairs. Austin stayed with Mario near the point and Luis and I ventured down the beach a few hundred yards. It didn’t take long to find fish cruising the flats as they came in waves. We parked near the big white rock that sticks out of the water which made for a great vantage point for one angler to spot for the other. Countless fish came in and cruised by, none willing to eat. It took me quite some time to adjust to casting far ahead of the fish and intercepting them with my fly, a great piece of information passed on to me by the Beaver Island veteran of our trip, Luis. I would go on to find this was essentially the most effective way to get an eat out of these Lake MI carp.

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Luis and I traded off turns casting at fish while the other sighted them. At one point, while Luis was on the rock and was spotting a pod of incoming fish for me, I looked down and had a 12-15lb carp incoming at around 15ft from my right foot. I stood as still as a statue and watched as the amazing fish cruised right on in and out of the flat in front of me, coming within 8ft of me as if I wasn’t even there. All it took was for me to slightly move my foot, less than an inch, to spook him out of sight.

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

As more and more fish came in and out of casting range without a single hookup, we decided to move down the flat and get more chances at new fish. One thing we noticed was that the carp would cruise the edges of 1-2′ of water and 4-6′ of water, right along the shelf/dropoff. The would come in as single fish all the way up to pods of 8 with most being pairs. With a lot of variables coming into play on Lake MI, from light currents to wind to sun position and more, there is a lot that factors in to making the right cast at the right distance to get your fly in front of the fish at the right time…something I struggled with for the first hour or so.

With multiple fly changes as well as casting strokes, we didn’t have a single hookup…despite somewhere around 50 shots. Luis decided to venture further down the beach while I waved for Mario to come join me. Austin had headed back to the house to change as the waders he was using had a decent leak. That didn’t stop him from capturing shots of town and getting some video footage.

Mario and I picked up where Luis and I had left off and traded off spotting and casting. With great vantage points from large boulders in the water, we continued to spot countless fish coming into our casting range but again, without success. As we moved from spot to spot, we found it was hard to find an area without fish as long as you find those parts of the flats with good edges into deeper water. With clouds of midges buzzing behind us, making it seem as if the shoreline was smoking from the giant columns of bugs, we decided to finally throw in our hat and head back to the house. But, not before a few more casts at incoming fish. As I gave Mario clock directions for the fish, they came out of the glare and into his casting distance. With a phenomenal cast, he lined up his fly for success. Within a few strips, he striped one last time and raised his rod tip. As quickly as his rod doubled over, it had straightened back out… We both looked at each other with the same amount of disappointment but couldn’t help but laugh and high five before heading back down the flat to the light house.

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

As we walked back towards the house talking about life and fly fishing, we noticed Austin in shorts waist-high, fishing the flats within the harbor. These flats were different than the rocky-bottomed flats around the island. Sand had deposited itself along the southern shoreline along some grass beds making for a gin clear, white sand flat. The water Austin was in was about 2′ deep and he was motioning to us, as we walked towards the water, to slow down and be quiet. He was stalking fish within the grasses, some right at his feet, off the shoreline where homeowners had given us permission to fish. I unfortunately did not see his motions and spooked a few 15-20lb carp out of the grass. Luis shortly joined us and we chatted about Mario’s unbuttoned carp and the fish on the flats around Austin. We paired up again and Luis and I continued to talk and began to plan out the evening. Mid-conversation, I see a dark figure behind Luis and turn. As I look down, a massive carp was cruising within 3′ of Luis’ foot. We both froze, individually trying to figure out what to do. Just as we both motioned to cast, the fish fled into deeper water.

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

It’s amazing how these fish sneak up on you, it happened numerous times throughout the week. And their senses are absolutely amazing. All it takes is one small step, the ratting of a rock, or the drop of a GoPro on a boat…ah hem, to spook these fish. I wouldn’t be surprised if someone told me they had farted and a nearby fish spooked.

We decided to wrap up the fishing around 3pm and head back to the house. Luis had headed back while Mario and I were fishing on the flats and picked up dinner for the night. Since it was technically Day 1 of the hosted portion of the trip, there would be a “meet and greet” cookout at The Fisherman’s House with all of the anglers and guides. We decided on a grill-session with brats, burgers, and dogs along with brews and bourbon to bring everyone together. While we waited the two other anglers (Joel and Cheryl), headed in on the 5pm ferry, we showered up and reminisced the day on the deck…of course with a lot of bug spray and a little bit of beer.

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

The Indigo crew showed up, shortly followed by our other two anglers. I fired up the grill and cooked away as Luis and Evan prepped some brats in beer and onions on the stove. After they were properly marinated, we threw them on the grill with all the other fix ins. Dave and Andrew (whom were on their own Beaver Island solo trip) showed up and pulled in with Andrew’s Towee behind his truck after a long day on the water. As the night went on, we were all able to formally meet and chat about Beaver Island, fly fishing, Tennessee, gear, life and more…all bringing something different to the table. It was a blast, one of those moments that made this trip unforgettable…brotherhood bringing a bunch of people from different walks of life together with one common interest/love.

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

As the night wound down, Dave and Andrew headed off to their motel as they were departing the next day. The guides headed back to their place after setting up a tentative plan with Luis and I for the morning…Day 1 of guided fishing. All in all, despite not catching any fish, it was an amazing day. We had spent quality time together and overall had been able to relax, enjoy our mini-vacation and first full day on the island. Life was good, and the dawn Day 4 of the trip was hours away…it was time for some quality shut-eye in preparation for yet another amazing day.

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Photo By Morgan Kupfer

Written By Morgan Kupfer – Originally Posted On TLTFF
Photos By Austin Green Weinstein and Morgan Kupfer – Austin Green Photography

 

 

 

 

TLTFF Beaver Island ’14 – Days 1 + 2 – Guest Post

Our Plane To Beaver Island! - Fly Fishing With Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Our Plane To Beaver Island! – Fly Fishing With Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

So days one and two were pretty much travel days so I figured they’d be easiest to just pair together. I have to preface this strain of posts that will be coming out over the next few days to journal our trip with this…this was one of the best experiences of my life. Period. I don’t write well, by any means, but I hope these posts help give you a taste of what we experienced on this trip, giving you an appetite for experiencing it for yourself one day.

A big thanks goes out to those of you who followed along via our social media outlets and through the hashtag #tltffbeaverisland14 we used to timeline and manifest the trip. An even bigger thanks goes out to Evan from Feather-Craft and CarpTrip.com for helping us get our ducks in a row and guiding us through the hosting process and Kevin Morlock, Steve Martinez, and Austin Adduci of Indigo Guide Service for giving us all a trip to remember forever and pass on stories of to our grandchildren. Thank you Bill and Tammy for opening up The Fisherman’s House to us pilgrims and for making it so special, something that ties the entire trip together. Thank you to the people of Beaver Island for being so welcoming to us fisherman’s antics and appreciating our overall love for what your home has to offer. Last but not least, thank you Austin Green for photographing and filming the trip, without you this trip would have been missing a certain little something…I hope all of our readers enjoy your images as much as we enjoyed your company.

Luis and I started to plan this hosted trip right after Luis returned from his trip last year and Evan from Feather-Craft and CarpTrip.com asked him if he would be interested in hosting a trip himself. After a few conversations and debates, the decision was made and it was time to put together logistics. Luis handled about 90% of it and deserves a large pat on the back for his planning genius (he does doit for a living though so there really was no better man for the job). Mario Garza, a long-time follower of the blog and one of our favorite fly tiers, was our first angler. It was all coming together. Two more anglers, Joel and Cheryl signed on filling two more spots and leaving one more to fill. We got into the 30 day countdown and there was still one spot left to fill and a lot of fine-tuning to do.

Austin Green of Austin Green Photography and The Uncommon Angler hopped on board as our last angler and a big weight was lifted off our shoulders. Over the course of a few more meetings and phone calls, planning was complete. June 19th couldn’t have come soon enough as a long week of work seemed to be stuck on slow-mo speed. Launch day finally came and the car was packed.

Day 1 – June 19th

I picked up Luis around 10am and we headed up to Baltimore to pick up Austin. We quickly loaded up the car at Austin’s place and started the 7 hour trek to Lorain, OH (right outside of Cleveland) where we would split the trip in half and spend the night with Luis’ family. The trip up to Ohio flew by. With only two stops, one for gas and food and one to stretch…um, pee. We arrived in Lorain around 6pm and were greeted by the best Puerto Rican food you could imagine (ask Austin, he had like 7 helpings). With bedrooms arranged and micro-brews in hand, it was time to sit back, talk fishing, and catch up with Luis’ family. We had a blast hanging out, relaxing, and thinking about what would be in store for the remainder of the trip. There was a big hex hatch going off while we were in Lorain, coming off of Lake Erie which was only a mile or so away from where we were staying. Of course us fly fisherman had to take a look and practice a little bit of beer-influenced entomology.

The Alchemist's Heady Topper And Hex Flies! - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

The Alchemist’s Heady Topper And Hex Flies! – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

The Hex Hatch Was Heavy at 7-Eleven On Our Way To The Airport In Charlevoix! - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

The Hex Hatch Was Heavy at 7-Eleven On Our Way To The Airport! – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

 

One thing we kept our eye on was weather. Since Great Lakes weather is so unpredictable, it was a crap shoot judging what would happen but the 7 day forecast for Beaver Island basically said 68 deg F with 5kts of wind and partly cloudy with a chance of thunderstorms every day…not ideal. We had our hopes up and looked forward with a great attitude. Overall, it was a pretty easy day with a great ending full of good food, good beer, and family.

Morgan Kupfer And Luis Da Wrench Santiago Planning Our Route - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Morgan Kupfer And Luis Santiago Planning Our Route – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Day 2 – June 20th

We woke up early with smiles on our faces knowing today would be the day we step foot on Beaver Island. Luis punched out some work early before we hit the road, dismissing some stress prior to the second leg of our trip to Beaver Island, another 7 hours. We hit the road and headed to Ann Arbor, MI to meet up with Mario. The 2.5 hours to Ann Arbor flew by, yet again. Mario was smiling ear toy ear as were we. We hit up the Walmart down the street to pick up odds and ends and some lunch. Thanks to Luis, I experienced my first White Castle burger and all I have to say is, why in the world aren’t there any of those around here in Maryland?!

Austin jumped in to Mario’s car to give him someone to chat with for the next couple of hours and to allow them to get to know each other a little more. With only a few stops, minor traffic, and a gnarly rainstorm…Charlevoix (where the airport was to get over to BI) was in sight…an super easy drive and second leg of the trek (sense a theme here?). The clouds parted as we drove into Charlevoix. We stopped one last time to grab some cash out of the ATM (since the one at Walmart was busted) and bug spray (which would prove to be a crucial addition to the packing list, ask Mario).

All Packed For Our Plane Ride - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

All Packed For Our Plane Ride – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

 

We rolled up to Fresh Air around 4pm, just in time for our 4:30pm flight. Cody checked us in and loaded up our bags. I unfortunately had the heaviest load (I also had a 22lb tent with us) and we were all over the 30lb limit. The load being so heavy, we had to send a few bags to go with the later plane.

Our Plane  - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Our Plane – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

 

The flight was an easy 15 minute jump over to Beaver Island and the flight in was amazing. The clouds had opened up and gave us an amazing look at what can only be described as the Caribbean in the middle of Lake MI. Prior to landing, we spotted somewhere around 20 carp cruising the flats on the East side of the island…just what we wanted to see. Flying over Beaver you can’t help but notice the vast amount of woods and swamp land. There are a few ponds on Beaver Island that are said to be loaded with pike. And yes, there are a lot of beavers on Beaver Island…

Our Pilot Prepares The Plane For Our Flight To Beaver Island - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Our Pilot Prepares The Plane For Our Flight – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

The Flight Controls On Our Plane To Beaver Island - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

The Flight Controls On Our Plane  – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

 

We unloaded the plane and immediately realized we needed to find the bug spray. The mosquitos were the size of the carp we were planning on catching…triple the size of the ones we had at home. But their size was against them as they flew as slow as molasses. The later plane landed and we grabbed our other bags. We loaded up the island shuttle, a short 5-10 minute ride in to town and to The Fisherman’s House was full of excitement and was the cheapest taxi ride ever…$1.50.

We drove into town as two of the Indigo boats were flying into the harbor…the perfect setup for excitement and anticipation of what was to come. We popped out of the shuttle and unloaded in a light rain. We put everything on the front porch as the Indigo guidespulled up with their outgoing clients. After introductions and a brief exchange of stories with the outgoing clients, it was time to do search out some brews to pop in the fridge and find some dinner. The deli and market, both owned by the McDonoughs, are steps away from the house and have everything one would need from groceries to gifts.

Captain Steve Martinez's Ford Expedition And Guide Boat - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Captain Steve Martinez’s Ford Expedition And Guide Boat – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

 

We walked about a half mile down the main road around the harbor to the Shamrock, a local bar/restaurant known for its awesome taxidermy wall decorations, amazing food, and irish influence (in case the name didn’t tip you off). There we no complaints about dinner, as most of us were almost licking our plates. We put away a few drinks before walking back to the house to setup the tent (we were a day early so, with permission, we setup camp in the side yard of The Fisherman’s House) and continue the merriment. On our way back we were able to stop and take in a few of the sights and sounds BI had to offer.

A Carp Carcass In The Neighbor's Backyard - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

A Carp Carcass In The Neighbor’s Backyard – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

An Old Barge On The Beaver Island Shoreline- Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

An Old Barge On The Beaver Island Shoreline- Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

A Stunning Series Of Floating Piers On Beaver Island - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

A Stunning Series Of Floating Piers On Beaver Island – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Once we got back to the house, the tent went up quick and gear was put together to checkout. As the night rolled on and the beer cans piled, we caught up with Evan fromFeather-Craft and exchanged stories. Evan is a great guy, one of the nicest I’ve ever met. He is the brains behind organizing hosted trips and has been great friends with the gentlemen of Indigo for quite a few years. As you will later find out, like I said, Evan is a stand-up guy, through and through.

Mario and I had been chatting a bit with Dave Hosler aka @pilecast (on Instagram). We found out a day or two before we left for the trip that he and Andrew Bosway of Scientific Anglers were hauling Andrew’s Towee up to BI for a few days of DIY fishing. Mario and I headed back down to Shamrocks to meet Dave and Andrew. It was great to finally meet Dave after following him on IG for a year or two now and to meet Andrew. We threw some stories around and made plans to have the guys come over for our meet and greet dinner tomorrow night.

Mario Garza, Morgan Kupfer And Luis Santiago Hanging Out In The Fisherman's House - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Mario Garza, Morgan Kupfer And Luis Santiago Hanging Out In The Fisherman’s House – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service 
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

As the merriment settled down and the realization of us waking up early for a full day tomorrow settled in and it was time to hit the hay. What we had in store was a great breakfast at the deli and a full day of DIY flats fishing together on foot…a chilly night was ahead, good thing we had a little bit of alcohol in our blood and mummy bags to keep us warm.

Our Tent! - Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island

Our Tent! – Fly Fishing with Indigo Guide Service on Beaver Island
Copyright 2014. Austin Green Weinstein. All Rights Reserved.

Written By Morgan Kupfer – Originally Posted On TLTFF
Photos By Austin Green Weinstein – Austin Green Photography

George Hill Art

George Hill is a Midwestern born art school drop out. His art draws from myriad environments around the world and the people and creatures who occupy them. He is obsessed with catching and painting fish as seen in his most recent work.

Brown 16 x 20", Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

Brown 16 x 20″, Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

Witchie Point Bone 16 x 20", Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

Witchie Point Bone 16 x 20″, Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

Dolly Varden 16 x 20", Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

Dolly Varden 16 x 20″, Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

Bonefish 18 x 24", Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

Bonefish 18 x 24″, Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

Bass Eye 12x12", Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

Bass Eye 12×12″, Oil On Canvas, George Hill Art

 

All works are for sale and George Hill can be reached at info@georgehillart.com or by visiting http://www.georgehillart.com