Pursuing Esox: Filming With Rock On Charters & 3-TAND

By Austin Green – Check out the original post on the 3-TAND.COM Blog!

Josh Laferty and Rock on Charters WILL put you on fish. He finds a way to catch the fish of ten thousand casts in only a few hundred!

Josh Laferty and Rock on Charters WILL put you on fish. He finds a way to catch the fish of ten thousand casts in only a few hundred!

 

The species known as the “fish of ten thousand casts” becomes no more predictable when you have a video camera on the boat. No amount of heavy planning or whether watching guarantees you capturing an eat while you are recording. Being with the right guide, in the right boat, and on the right river does boost your chances, however, training your batteries and memory cards to last an entire day of rolling can be improbable—nor is it realistic to keep your eyes glued to the LCD monitor all day long. Once in a blue moon a filmmaker gets lucky, and has the camera rolling at the right time, and in the right direction.

While filming in Virginia with Rock On Charters, I was mid-interview with Josh Laferty when such luck was afforded to us. Josh was wrapping up a comment about the success of musky research in Virginia, when in the top left corner of the frame, Mark Erdosy hooks into a feisty Musky. Zooming out and quickly finding focus, I managed to seamlessly capture the fight and netting of the fish. Mark joyously holds up his fish exclaiming, “Third Musky ever, second with Rock On Charters. Pretty badass time in Virginia!” You can’t plan a scene like that.

“Third Musky ever, second with Rock On Charters. Pretty badass time in Virginia!”

“Third Musky ever, second with Rock On Charters. Pretty badass time in Virginia!”

 

Every filmmaker needs a break on the boat, particularly when playing the role of cinematographer in a film focusing primarily on Musky. On every leg of filming Pursuing Esox, I have put the camera back in its case, and picked up a fly rod. When I am fishing for any big predator, I prefer the 3-TAND T-Series. Most Musky and Pike won’t ever get on the drag of your reel, and one could easily catch a trophy Esox of any sort with just a line and rod. However, I enjoy traveling around with a T-90 for other reasons than its drag performance. In my opinion, the most crucial attribute is its durability.

Taking A Break From Filming!

 

I can beat up the T-90 on muddy, rocky Musky Rivers for months on end through the winter, and without any maintenance, I can take off to New Orleans and put a thirty pound redfish on its drag. It is dependable, it is tough, and it never underperforms. The 3-TAND T-90 is my reel of choice when fishing in extreme conditions—and the reel that lives in my rod case when filming Pursuing Esox.

A passionate character to say the least. Austin has found a deep love for this sport and for chasing these fish.

A passionate character to say the least. Austin has found a deep love for this sport and for chasing these fish.

This Is Fly Magazine – June 2015 – “Pursuing Esox”

We are so grateful to have our article “Pursuing Esox” featured in this month’s online issue of This Is Fly Magazine! Jeff Brennan wrote the words and I took the photos! A huge thanks to everyone who helped make this project (the article and the documentary) possible! You all know who you are: Katie Blizzard, Brian Bergeson, Jon Bukowski, Kevin Ramirez, Brian Cadoret, Charlie Gordon, David Hegburg, Adam Silvis, Mike Ball, and Justin Damude! The list goes on and on and on, with too many to remember!

Check it out here: http://www.thisisfly.com/issue52_4.html?startPage=70&

Snakeheads On The Fly

It’s a beautiful sight to see, that is, a flats skiff hauling down I-95, nearly as north as the Mason Dixon line. We were on our way to pursue Eastern Snakeheads on the fly after a long night of partying. The idea looked good on paper: “A late night of mind altering substances, followed by a full morning of pursuing elusive predatory fish.” And from the moment of our first cast, we realized that this idea truly, and only looked good on paper. We managed to get into a whole mess of five to ten pound snakeheads, but our lack of proper hand-eye coordination left us empty handed–though it was ridiculously awesome to have a few bang on our frog and mice patterns. We just couldn’t connect. And this is why fishing is called fishing for a reason. Baby steps, it’s all a learning curve!

By Austin Green.